A flat surface has the potential to become three dimensional with a single fold. If the intention is to represent a particular three-dimensional object then the folding of paper requires a particular sequence and rhythm.

Similar skills in the selection of gesture, colour and material require the same precision if the intention is to represent three dimensions on a flat surface. It also requires a shared understanding of conventions in respect of the use of shade and light.

This series challenges the extent to which a commonly held frame of reference of the viewer affects their perception and creates the appearance of folds and the illusion of depth. What if the selection of shade and light is not intended to represent a three dimensional object but is merely the viewers assumption?

Unfolded View II, 2021
Watercolour and ink on paper, 73 x 117 cm
Unfolded View I, 2021
Watercolour and ink on paper, 72 x 116 cm